Birthing on Country

CPD Hours: 1
Current as at 23 February 2022
Aboriginal people fare worse than non-Aboriginal people when accessing usual healthcare services. Health services for Australian Aboriginal people must be tailored and implementation of the five enablers (cultural competence, participation rates, organisational, clinical governance and compliance, and availability of services) is likely to affect the effectiveness of health services for Aboriginal people.

Tags:

“Understand the cultural needs of Aboriginal mothers”

Course Content

Aboriginal people fare worse than non-Aboriginal people when accessing usual healthcare services. Health services for Australian Aboriginal people must be tailored and implementation of the five enablers (cultural competence, participation rates, organisational, clinical governance and compliance, and availability of services) is likely to affect the effectiveness of health services for Aboriginal people.

For four decades there has been a global movement led by Indigenous people to return birthing services to Indigenous communities. This change is seen as an important contributor to the cultural healing required to address the impact of colonisation which had weakened the health, strength and spirit of the community.

Following a review of maternity services in Australia in 2009, Birthing on Country Services was defined as: “maternity services designed and delivered for Indigenous women that encompass some or all of the following elements: are community-based and governed; allow for incorporation of traditional practice; involve a connection with land and country; incorporate a holistic definition of health; value Indigenous and non-Indigenous ways of knowing and learning, risk assessment and service delivery; are culturally competent and are developed by, or with, Indigenous people.” Cultural security is a key element of accessible services for Indigenous peoples globally, although few studies have examined this empirically.

Evidence about effective, scalable strategies to improve maternal and infant outcomes is urgently needed. The findings of this study have significant implications in directing the future design, funding, delivery and evaluation of health care services for Aboriginal mothers. This Service has resulted in greater integration across Indigenous community-based and tertiary maternal-infant health care and support service for families. Birthing on Country Service not only aims to provide clinically and culturally exceptional care but also contributes to addressing the social and cultural determinants of health through employment and education, incorporation of cultural practices and addressing racism.

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Understand the cultural needs of Aboriginal mothers
  • Learn about the strategies to improve maternal and infant outcomes
  • Investigate the importance of cultural security
  • Explore the effects of BiOC
The Nursing CPD Institute

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