Cannabis and Other Plant-Based Treatments for Chronic Pain

CPD Hours: .5
Current as at 27 October 2021
Musculoskeletal conditions affect 20-33% of the world’s population, they are the second greatest contributor to disability and, in addition to mobility restrictions, are linked to depression, early retirement, and a reduced ability to socially participate.

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“Understand the severity of chronic pain and its effects”

Course Content

Painful musculoskeletal conditions affect 20-33% of the world’s population, they are the second greatest contributor to disability and, in addition to mobility restrictions, are linked to depression, early retirement, and a reduced ability to socially participate.

Chronic pain is subject to not only genetic factors but is also influenced by our past experiences of pain and the context in which it occurs. Our emotional state, anxiety, memories, and attention/distraction are all factors that augment or diminish our experience of pain and therefore factors that also influence our ability to function.

The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines chronic pain as persistent or recurrent pain lasting longer than 3 months. Chronic pain is not a mere temporal extension of acute pain, as it lacks the warning function of physiological nociception, and it is maintained by factors pathogenetically and physically remote from the initial cause, such as central sensitization, altered pain modulation, glial activation, and neuroimmune signalling.

Chronic pain is nowadays used as an umbrella term for referring to a wide range of painful conditions, such as fibromyalgia, migraine, or long-standing pain states having an unclear etiology. In the field of research, there are several reasons to use “chronic pain” as an umbrella term across diagnoses, especially in epidemiological studies.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid and one of the most abundant 113 identified cannabinoids as well as 432 other chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. Its mechanism of action has not been determined; however, it may interact with numerous targets. The term medical cannabis has been used to reference prescription preparations of the cannabis plant for therapeutic purposes. Chronic pain is the most common self-reported reason that patients use medical cannabis, and severe or chronic pain is the most frequent condition cited for seeking a medical cannabis certification.

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Understand the severity of chronic pain and its effects
  • Discover the efforts these researchers made to study meaningful benefits of cannabis and other plant – based treatments
  • Discuss the implications of the present findings
  • Investigate improvements in pain severity during this study
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