Getting a clinical innovation into practice

Getting a clinical innovation into practice

CPD Hours: .5
Current as at 06 June 2022
Many factors can play a role in slowing down the process of implementation of innovation in health care, for example, one reason for the limited success is that key players typically focus on process rather than on output, looking, say, not at improvements in patient care but at whether there can even be a compliance with the new process. This article skillfully explains how important it is to address the barriers to innovation in health care.

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Explore the science of implementation of research findings into clinical practice, the definition, duration and effectiveness

Course Content

The 18th-century German philosopher Goethe noted, “To put your ideas into action is the most difficult thing in the world.”

Innovation in health care presents two kinds of financial challenges: funding the innovation’s development and figuring out who will implement it into practice. For example, one problem is the long investment time needed for new drugs or therapies that require federal agencies’ approval. While IT start-up may be able to be implemented in two to three years, biotech, on the other hand, have to wait ten years even to find out whether a product will be approved for use. But, separately from those, the research findings that find evidence that an existing practice process could change in a way that care is delivered in a much better and safer way, should not take that long to be implemented if it even isn’t necessary to spend funds to do that.

One of the by-products of the complexity of health care organizations is their remarkable resilience in the face of pressure; even when that pressure is one for positive change. Many factors can play a role in slowing down the process of implementation of innovation in health care, for example, one reason for the limited success is that key players typically focus on process rather than on output, looking, say, not at improvements in patient care but at whether there can even be a compliance with the new process. While the generation and implementation of innovative ideas have its challenges, the issues around the spread of innovation are often the most frustrating. Take, for example, an idea that has already been generated, tested, and implemented to deliver a benefit to patients or healthcare professionals; yet despite this evidence of effectiveness, the idea does not become universally implemented across the entire healthcare organization.

The mechanistic model of health care organizations drives some innovation advocates to coercive-power approaches for spreading change. The very metaphor of “spreading innovation” suggests that a pushing or driving force, with its own agenda and power, is behind the idea. The natural reaction in a human social system to such a push is to push back and assert individual autonomy.
Outside health care organisations, there is a lot of marvel at the scope and pace of innovation in high-profile medical technologies, but less is known about innovation in basic clinical, business, and service delivery processes. This article skillfully explains how important it is to address the barriers to innovation in health care.

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Explore the science of implementation of research findings into clinical practice, the definition, duration and effectiveness
  • Discuss the barriers to clinical innovation adoption
  • Review the implementation strategies
  • Gain an understanding of the necessary rigor required to address the barriers to implementation strategies

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