Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status

Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status – selected topics 2020

CPD Hours: 1.5
Current as at 15 October 2021
The colonisation of Australia brought with it exposure to alcohol and a major disruption to the traditional diet and hunter-gatherer lifestyles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and this has had a significant impact on health disparities.

Tags:

“Build a strong emphasis on the role of health promotion in facilitating health improvement for A&TSI community”

Course Content

The colonisation of Australia brought with it exposure to alcohol and a major disruption to the traditional diet and hunter-gatherer lifestyles of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and this has had a significant impact on health disparities.

Chronic diseases related to diet and lifestyle are over-presented in Aboriginal people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 3.3 times more likely to suffer from diabetes, are 1.2 times more likely to have cardiovascular disease, and 1.6 times more likely to be obese than non-Aboriginal Australians.

This disproportionate burden of disease and risk factors reflects how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health has been shaped drastically by loss of identity, loss of family, racism, and trauma.

By providing high-quality knowledge and information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health to policymakers and everyone within Australian healthcare, the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet hopes that this summary will serve to improve health for this population.

The summary is based on another document, the ‘Overview of A&TSI health status 2020 (overview)’. Its aim is to support all of us who are involved with providing healthcare to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australian healthcare. It brings us closer to understanding the social and cultural determinants of health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, such as understanding the conditions they are born into, how they grew in those conditions, and how they live. For example, education is one of the most important elements of developing health literacy, yet Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience poor retention of secondary students as low as 56% in some of our states. This also means that for those who have not completed year 12 of high school, chances of obtaining work are low, which further impacts their lifestyle and therefore, health.

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Build a strong emphasis on the role of health promotion in facilitating health improvement for A&TSI community
  • Understand the numerous, well-documented barriers to accessing healthcare in Australia
  • Discuss informed practice in community and health services
  • Review the appropriate health programs and services suggested in this publication
The Nursing CPD Institute

Join NCPDI to access this content.


Join Now

Login if you already have an account.


Login