Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

CPD Hours: .5
Current as at 13 October 2021
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a condition arising from exposure to alcohol during a mother's pregnancy, causing irreversible brain damage and growth problems that vary from child to child.

Tags:

“Understand the mechanics of FASD”

Course Content

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a condition arising from exposure to alcohol during a mother’s pregnancy, causing irreversible brain damage and growth problems that vary from child to child.

Alcohol is a teratogen that can readily cross the placenta, damaging the brain and other organs of the developing embryo and fetus. Any amount of alcohol consumed during pregnancy results in alcohol entering the bloodstream, crossing the placenta and reaching the developing fetus. Because the fetus metabolizes alcohol slower than an adult, higher blood alcohol concentrations develop in the developing baby than in the mother’s body. Alcohol then interferes with the delivery of oxygen and optimal nutrition to the developing baby, harming the development of tissues and organs and causing permanent brain damage in the baby.

The current findings show that every year more than  100 000   children are born with FAS   worldwide, a   lifelong disorder with a known and preventable cause.  The harmful effects of alcohol on a fetus,  representing many cases of preventable long-term disability, is recognized globally as a public health problem.

Research has not been able to define the pattern,  amount, or critical period of prenatal alcohol exposure necessary for structural or functional teratogenesis,  but, we do know that not every woman who drinks during pregnancy will deliver a child with  FASD. 

This paper puts light on the uncertainty of other factors that might influence a fetus’s vulnerability to the teratogenic effects of alcohol and suggests that environmental influences and possibly paternal lifestyle influence the occurrence of alcohol use during pregnancy.

More effective prevention strategies targeting alcohol use during pregnancy and surveillance of FASD are urgently needed. Australia’s future efforts should recognize the urgent need to establish an FASD surveillance system to monitor its prevalence, which will provide a basis for public health policy, healthcare planning, and resource allocation for FASD prevention initiatives

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Understand the mechanics of FASD
  • Discuss the life-long effects of FASD
  • Be familiar with FASD prevention methods
  • Learn about directions for future research of FASD 
The Nursing CPD Institute

Join NCPDI to access this content.


Join Now

Login if you already have an account.


Login