Why would a woman screen?

CPD Hours: .5
Current as at 19 October 2021
Cervical cancer has been acknowledged as the first cancer that can be effectively prevented, for which the implementation of cervical screening is meritorious in the past half-century.

Tags:

“Facilitators and barriers for women least likely to participate in cervical screening in Australia”

Course Content

Cervical cancer has been acknowledged as the first cancer that can be effectively prevented, for which the implementation of cervical screening is meritorious in the past half-century.

Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, with approximately 530,000 new cases each year, of which 445,000 occur in less developed regions. Australia was one of the first high-income countries to implement primary HPV-based screening in the Renewal of the Australian National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP) in December 2017, where women aged 25 to 74 are now screened every 5 years with primary HPV-based screening.

In many developed countries, the incidence of cervical cancer has been significantly reduced by the introduction of organised screening programmes however, in Australia, a fall in screening coverage is becoming a cause for concern. Evidence shows a strong preventive effect from cervical screening, through detecting, managing and treating precursor lesions; and, an organized, population-based cervical screening program, achieving high coverage and equality, can contribute to a substantial reduction in cervical cancer incidence and mortality.

The cervical cancer screening test allows for early detection of cervical cancer. Pap smear screening, which identifies cytological abnormalities of the cervical transformation zone, has helped to reduce the incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer by 70% in developed countries within 3 years after the implementation of screening programs. It is well known that cancer develops 10 years or more after the development of detectable precancerous lesions.

Unfortunately, many women remain asymptomatic until the disease has advanced, especially those women who are not sexually active. Women between 30 and 40 years of age are at a higher risk of precancerous lesions.

A systematic review of cancer screening is critical to ensuring high-quality, effective disease prevention and detection and management.

In this study, the case-control audit was used to evaluate cervical cancer screening in a Western Sydney suburb with a population of low socioeconomic status.

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Discover the issues related to cervical screening testing in Australia
  • Identify the rate of cervical screening testing in Australia
  • Interpret the reasons for low compliance with cervical screening testing 
  • Define what influences the cervical screening participation 
The Nursing CPD Institute

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