Accessing Health Services: Challenges for People from Migrant and Refugee Backgrounds
CPD Hours / Duration
1 hour/s
Cost
Depends on Membership level

Accessing Health Services: Challenges for People from Migrant and Refugee Backgrounds

Presenter Amanda Bowden, PICAC Project Officer - Diversicare

Amanda has a PhD in Cultural Anthropology (the study of human cultures) and has worked in various roles towards addressing inequalities that indigenous peoples, as well as asylum seekers and other people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, may experience.

Amanda’s current role with Diversicare/ PICAC (Partners in Culturally Appropriate Care) means she can share her fascination with the multiple realities we humans create, through cultural competence training, as well as working with communities to improve access to aged care services in Brisbane for people from CALD backgrounds.

Course Content

This webinar explains some of the barriers to access and engagement with health care services experienced by people from migrant and refugee backgrounds. It outlines the context of refugee health during settlement in Australia and some issues of particular concern.

Three main problems affecting access and engagement are explored. These are unfamiliar environment, inadequate health information sharing, and trust and privacy. These issues are illustrated by including observations and comments by people from refugee backgrounds. Strategies are suggested to help reduce barriers of language, culture, unfamiliar health system and to develop trust between the health care worker and patient.

Target Audience

Learning Outcomes

In this session, you will:

  • Gain an understanding of issues impacting health care for people from migrant and refugee backgrounds
  • Recognise barriers to accessing and engaging with health care
  • Examine strategies to support access and engagement for people from migrant and refugee backgrounds
  • Review the importance of building trust, and health information sharing, for refugees who may be unfamiliar with the Australian health care environment